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This WSJ infographic accompanies an article about how social widgets can track users’ browsing habits, regardless of whether or not we click “like” or “tweet” buttons on a certain page.
Here is their explanation of how social widgets for sites like Facebook and Twitter will be able to tell that we’ve been spending an unhealthy amount of time online reading gossip blogs and watching pirated movies:

For this to work, a person only needs to have logged into Facebook or  Twitter once in the past month. The sites will continue to collect  browsing data, even if the person closes their browser or turns off  their computers, until that person explicitly logs out of their Facebook  or Twitter accounts, the study found. 

Collecting data from Internet users via cookies is not uncommon or new, something to keep in mind since WSJ does cast a shady light on these practices. The article cites “growing concern about the privacy of Internet and smartphone users” but this also seems to be a given fact — it’s the price we all end up paying for personalized web experiences.
Is there an alternative solution for social sharers to have our cake and eat it too?
Read more details from the article here.

This WSJ infographic accompanies an article about how social widgets can track users’ browsing habits, regardless of whether or not we click “like” or “tweet” buttons on a certain page.

Here is their explanation of how social widgets for sites like Facebook and Twitter will be able to tell that we’ve been spending an unhealthy amount of time online reading gossip blogs and watching pirated movies:

For this to work, a person only needs to have logged into Facebook or Twitter once in the past month. The sites will continue to collect browsing data, even if the person closes their browser or turns off their computers, until that person explicitly logs out of their Facebook or Twitter accounts, the study found. 

Collecting data from Internet users via cookies is not uncommon or new, something to keep in mind since WSJ does cast a shady light on these practices. The article cites “growing concern about the privacy of Internet and smartphone users” but this also seems to be a given fact — it’s the price we all end up paying for personalized web experiences.

Is there an alternative solution for social sharers to have our cake and eat it too?

Read more details from the article here.

Filed under social widgets facebook twitter infographic wsj privacy social media Social media