Print to Pixels

Make the leap

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From The Oatmeal, which also joined the SOPA protest:

For the next 24 hours I am blacking out TheOatmeal.com in protest of SOPA and PIPA. If one of these bills were to pass, this page is what many sites on the internet would look like. As someone who creates content for the web, earns a living from it, and has had his content pirated, I do feel that we need better legislation against online piracy. I do not, however, think that SOPA or PIPA are the legislation we need. Want to help in the fight against SOPA / PIPA? First, go learn about the bills. After that go contact your elected officials. Wikipedia has a handy-dandy page set up which allows you to locate your state representative. Hugs and jet skis, -The Oatmeal

What is repeated over and over again is that Americans are urged to contact their representatives to protest SOPA (Stop Online Piracy Act) and PIPA (Protect IP Act). But let’s be real: This would hurt everyone.
If you want to do something about it, this is what Wikipedia recommends:
 
Contact your local State Department, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, or similar branch of government. Tell them you oppose SOPA and PIPA, and any similar legislation. SOPA and PIPA will affect sites outside of the United States, and actions to sites inside the United States (like Wikipedia) will also affect non-American readers — like you. Calling your own government will also let them know you don’t want them to create their own bad anti-Internet legislation.
Let me end this post with an interview with Marshall McLuhan, whose clairvoyant words really highlight the significance of what our world, the Internet, risks losing:

"We’re in a process of making a tribe, where just as books and their private point of view are being replaced by the new media, so our concepts which underlie our actions, our social life are changing [….] We were more concerned with what the group knows, of feeling as it does, of acting ‘with it’. Not apart from it."

From The Oatmeal, which also joined the SOPA protest:

For the next 24 hours I am blacking out TheOatmeal.com in protest of SOPA and PIPA. If one of these bills were to pass, this page is what many sites on the internet would look like. 

As someone who creates content for the web, earns a living from it, and has had his content pirated, I do feel that we need better legislation against online piracy. 
do not, however, think that SOPA or PIPA are the legislation we need. 

Want to help in the fight against SOPA / PIPA? First, go learn about the bills. After that go contact your elected officials. Wikipedia has a handy-dandy page set up which allows you to locate your state representative. 

Hugs and jet skis, 
-The Oatmeal

What is repeated over and over again is that Americans are urged to contact their representatives to protest SOPA (Stop Online Piracy Act) and PIPA (Protect IP Act). But let’s be real: This would hurt everyone.

If you want to do something about it, this is what Wikipedia recommends:

Contact your local State Department, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, or similar branch of government. Tell them you oppose SOPA and PIPA, and any similar legislation. SOPA and PIPA will affect sites outside of the United States, and actions to sites inside the United States (like Wikipedia) will also affect non-American readers — like you. Calling your own government will also let them know you don’t want them to create their own bad anti-Internet legislation.

Let me end this post with an interview with Marshall McLuhan, whose clairvoyant words really highlight the significance of what our world, the Internet, risks losing:

"We’re in a process of making a tribe, where just as books and their private point of view are being replaced by the new media, so our concepts which underlie our actions, our social life are changing [….] We were more concerned with what the group knows, of feeling as it does, of acting ‘with it’. Not apart from it."

Filed under canada sopa pipa protest oatmeal blackout how to protest canadian law mcluhan global village internet web wikipedia

2 notes &


This inspires me and spurred me to post here, which helps me work towards that weekly goal to make at least one blog post. Win/win!

The Cult of Done Manifesto
There are three states of being. Not knowing, action and completion.
Accept that everything is a draft. It helps to get it done.
There is no editing stage.
Pretending you know what you’re doing is almost the same as knowing what you are doing, so just accept that you know what you’re doing even if you don’t and do it.
Banish procrastination. If you wait more than a week to get an idea done, abandon it.
The point of being done is not to finish but to get other things done.
Once you’re done you can throw it away.
Laugh at perfection. It’s boring and keeps you from being done.
People without dirty hands are wrong. Doing something makes you right.
Failure counts as done. So do mistakes.
Destruction is a variant of done.
If you have an idea and publish it on the internet, that counts as a ghost of done.
Done is the engine of more.
Source: Bre Pettis and Kio Stark

This inspires me and spurred me to post here, which helps me work towards that weekly goal to make at least one blog post. Win/win!

The Cult of Done Manifesto

  1. There are three states of being. Not knowing, action and completion.
  2. Accept that everything is a draft. It helps to get it done.
  3. There is no editing stage.
  4. Pretending you know what you’re doing is almost the same as knowing what you are doing, so just accept that you know what you’re doing even if you don’t and do it.
  5. Banish procrastination. If you wait more than a week to get an idea done, abandon it.
  6. The point of being done is not to finish but to get other things done.
  7. Once you’re done you can throw it away.
  8. Laugh at perfection. It’s boring and keeps you from being done.
  9. People without dirty hands are wrong. Doing something makes you right.
  10. Failure counts as done. So do mistakes.
  11. Destruction is a variant of done.
  12. If you have an idea and publish it on the internet, that counts as a ghost of done.
  13. Done is the engine of more.

Source: Bre Pettis and Kio Stark

Filed under cult of done productivity awesome accompishments inspire just do it

3 notes &

Is the Social Media Manager here to stay?

image

A couple years ago, we asked ourselves if social media was just a fad when Twitter had self-proclaimed “experts” or “gurus” popping up everywhere (a label, by the way, that I do not take lightly and treat as seriously as I would use the term “journalist”). Today, we have social media managers, strategists, editors, community managers, account managers, “ninjas”, “sherpas”, the list goes on.

Recently, I was fortunate to attend this year’s mesh conference for the very first time and went to a workshop hosted by Rob Fishman (@rbfishman), social media editor for the Huffington Post. [Note: After the conference, Rob had tweeted that he would be leaving HuffPo to study at Cornell.]

Two things caught my attention:

  1. In his talk, he described the culture of Huffington Post as having all editors as social media editors. While they manage their own personal brand as influencers in their field, the online paper promotes and benefits from their audience reach.
  2. Rob’s description of his role sounded like a hybrid between product and editorial — he spoke of the social strategy on the site such as the “like” buttons as much as he spoke of how he worked closely with the editorial team.

These observations were in line with what became one of the larger themes of the conference: social media should be integrated across all business units. I couldn’t agree more with this and, in fact, this is something I have thought about before I even got into social media as a profession.

Let’s look back through history:

Change happens, and if email took 40 years to get where it is today, who knows how far social media will change the job industry in digital media and beyond. Some say that good social media managers are like a Jack/Jill of all trades: they need to work with different departments to get the job done and, as a result, they pick up a little bit of everything along the way. Will companies, for example, still need community managers if the role of community management is absorbed across different roles?

If this is the case, I believe one clear development will emerge from this shift: there will always be a demand for people responsible for ensuring social media is integrated properly within a business and/or each department. We can call them social media managers or strategists now, but the title doesn’t really matter as much as what the role entails.

This is just my perspective from what I’ve seen, but who knows what trends management leaders or HR/recruitment professionals see on their end, as I am sure they are also watching with great interest in the sidelines.

Where do you think the social media job industry is headed?

Filed under Social media trends mesh11 job industry work history